Tiny protestors in Russia, again. From the Guardian article:
"Political opposition forces are using new technologies to carry out public events – using toys with placards at mini-protests," Andrei Mulintsev, the [Moscow]’s deputy police chief, said at a press conference this week, according to local media. "In our opinion, this is still an unsanctioned public event…"
Police have tried to pressure [activists] into shutting down the doll protests, organisers said. “They tried to tell us our event was illegal – they even said that to put toys in the snow, we had to rent it from the city authorities,” Alexandrova said.
All authorities appear to be on high alert, as Russia prepares for its next day of protest on 4 February, one month before a presidential vote that Putin hopes will sweep him back into the Kremlin. On Thursday, the Moscow mayor’s office approved the opposition’s request to gather up to 50,000 people for a march through part of the city centre.”

Tiny protestors in Russia, again. From the Guardian article:

"Political opposition forces are using new technologies to carry out public events – using toys with placards at mini-protests," Andrei Mulintsev, the [Moscow]’s deputy police chief, said at a press conference this week, according to local media. "In our opinion, this is still an unsanctioned public event…"

Police have tried to pressure [activists] into shutting down the doll protests, organisers said. “They tried to tell us our event was illegal – they even said that to put toys in the snow, we had to rent it from the city authorities,” Alexandrova said.

All authorities appear to be on high alert, as Russia prepares for its next day of protest on 4 February, one month before a presidential vote that Putin hopes will sweep him back into the Kremlin. On Thursday, the Moscow mayor’s office approved the opposition’s request to gather up to 50,000 people for a march through part of the city centre.”